Andrew Wood's Sermon Notes - ReKindle

  

Jesus at the lakeside; re-thinking & recognising.

1. Jesus takes what the disciples have. “Jesus said bring some of the fish you have just caught” (21:10)   Like the story of the feeding of the 5000, Jesus takes what people bring & transforms them.  Here Jesus takes the fish caught when the disciples follow his command, and makes breakfast from them.  Jesus always starts where we are, with what we already have & transforms the offering.  What do we bring to Jesus  - in worship, in service, in vision for our communities?

2.  Jesus shares a meal. “Jesus said to them: “Come and have breakfast” (21:12)  So many of the key incidents of the gospel happen around a meal table.  It is at table fellowship that Jesus reveals who he is (the friends of sinners & outcasts), it is over meals that teaching happens, ultimately the breaking of bread that is the last supper and the revelation of Christ at Emmaus.  How do we find Christ through meals we share with others – and at communion?  And why breakfast? – the breaking of one period into a new faith experience?

3.  The disciples know who Jesus is: “No one dared ask “Who are you?” because they knew it was the Lord” (21:12)  In the recent BBC TV series the risen Jesus was played by a different actor from the earthly Jesus – to make the point that something new & mysterious is happening.  And yet it is the same Jesus too – the disciples recognise him by the offering of food to them (in an Emmaus-style revelation?) and in the extraordinary haul of fish, which echoes the first call of the disciples in Luke 5.  How to we re-think how we recognise Jesus – in the face of others, in the face of people in need (Matthew 5)?  The good news is that we can recognise Jesus – but not in ways we might expect.

 

Jesus at the lakeside; re-thinking & recognising.

1. Jesus takes what the disciples have. “Jesus said bring some of the fish you have just caught” (21:10)   Like the story of the feeding of the 5000, Jesus takes what people bring & transforms them.  Here Jesus takes the fish caught when the disciples follow his command, and makes breakfast from them.  Jesus always starts where we are, with what we already have & transforms the offering.  What do we bring to Jesus  - in worship, in service, in vision for our communities?

2.  Jesus shares a meal. “Jesus said to them: “Come and have breakfast” (21:12)  So many of the key incidents of the gospel happen around a meal table.  It is at table fellowship that Jesus reveals who he is (the friends of sinners & outcasts), it is over meals that teaching happens, ultimately the breaking of bread that is the last supper and the revelation of Christ at Emmaus.  How do we find Christ through meals we share with others – and at communion?  And why breakfast? – the breaking of one period into a new faith experience?

3.  The disciples know who Jesus is: “No one dared ask “Who are you?” because they knew it was the Lord” (21:12)  In the recent BBC TV series the risen Jesus was played by a different actor from the earthly Jesus – to make the point that something new & mysterious is happening.  And yet it is the same Jesus too – the disciples recognise him by the offering of food to them (in an Emmaus-style revelation?) and in the extraordinary haul of fish, which echoes the first call of the disciples in Luke 5.  How to we re-think how we recognise Jesus – in the face of others, in the face of people in need (Matthew 5)?  The good news is that we can recognise Jesus – but not in ways we might expect.

 

´╗┐´╗┐Jesus at the lakeside; re-thinking & recognising.

1. Jesus takes what the disciples have. “Jesus said bring some of the fish you have just caught” (21:10)   Like the story of the feeding of the 5000, Jesus takes what people bring & transforms them.  Here Jesus takes the fish caught when the disciples follow his command, and makes breakfast from them.  Jesus always starts where we are, with what we already have & transforms the offering.  What do we bring to Jesus  - in worship, in service, in vision for our communities?

2.  Jesus shares a meal. “Jesus said to them: “Come and have breakfast” (21:12)  So many of the key incidents of the gospel happen around a meal table.  It is at table fellowship that Jesus reveals who he is (the friends of sinners & outcasts), it is over meals that teaching happens, ultimately the breaking of bread that is the last supper and the revelation of Christ at Emmaus.  How do we find Christ through meals we share with others – and at communion?  And why breakfast? – the breaking of one period into a new faith experience?

3.  The disciples know who Jesus is: “No one dared ask “Who are you?” because they knew it was the Lord” (21:12)  In the recent BBC TV series the risen Jesus was played by a different actor from the earthly Jesus – to make the point that something new & mysterious is happening.  And yet it is the same Jesus too – the disciples recognise him by the offering of food to them (in an Emmaus-style revelation?) and in the extraordinary haul of fish, which echoes the first call of the disciples in Luke 5.  How to we re-think how we recognise Jesus – in the face of others, in the face of people in need (Matthew 5)?  The good news is that we can recognise Jesus – but not in ways we might expect.

 

 

ReThinking

Jesus at the lakeside; re-thinking & recognising.

1. Jesus takes what the disciples have. “Jesus said bring some of the fish you have just caught” (21:10)   Like the story of the feeding of the 5000, Jesus takes what people bring & transforms them.  Here Jesus takes the fish caught when the disciples follow his command, and makes breakfast from them.  Jesus always starts where we are, with what we already have & transforms the offering.  What do we bring to Jesus  - in worship, in service, in vision for our communities?

2.  Jesus shares a meal. “Jesus said to them: “Come and have breakfast” (21:12)  So many of the key incidents of the gospel happen around a meal table.  It is at table fellowship that Jesus reveals who he is (the friends of sinners & outcasts), it is over meals that teaching happens, ultimately the breaking of bread that is the last supper and the revelation of Christ at Emmaus.  How do we find Christ through meals we share with others – and at communion?  And why breakfast? – the breaking of one period into a new faith experience?

3.  The disciples know who Jesus is: “No one dared ask “Who are you?” because they knew it was the Lord” (21:12)  In the recent BBC TV series the risen Jesus was played by a different actor from the earthly Jesus – to make the point that something new & mysterious is happening.  And yet it is the same Jesus too – the disciples recognise him by the offering of food to them (in an Emmaus-style revelation?) and in the extraordinary haul of fish, which echoes the first call of the disciples in Luke 5.  How to we re-think how we recognise Jesus – in the face of others, in the face of people in need (Matthew 5)?  The good news is that we can recognise Jesus – but not in ways we might expect.

 

 

ReShaping - seeing differently, seeing as God sees.

   In order to re-shape, you have to imagine something differently, just as the potter or the sculptor sees something more in the clay or stone.

In this passage there are 3 ways of seeing differently   

1.  Jesus sees Paul differently– Paul’s self-image is that of upholder, guardian an protector of the faith.  Others see him as a violent opponent and persecutor, who goes the extra mile to purify his faith from followers of Jesus.  But Jesus sees Paul as someone who needs to be re-shaped, who spending his life kicking against the very love which seeks him out.  “I am Jesus, who you are persecuting, BUT get up and enter the city, and you will be told what to do..”  the BUT here is because Jesus can imagine him as an apostle, a messenger, a worker in the kingdom.  How does God imagine us – as we are – or as he dreams us to be.  How do we answer that call?

2.  Ananias is invited to see Paul differently.  Not as persecutor but as an instrument of God’s grace, chosen for a particular task.  So Ananias has to enter the world of grace rather than the world which sees people only as what they have been, or done.  He has to become a risk-taker for the Kingdom.  He has to be willing to see Paul as an apostle and a fellow-worker.  Who might we see as co-workers if we are to re-shape our world?

    3.  Paul sees himself differently.  Not as the one in charge, the one with the plan, but as the one who is dependent on others, on Ananias to heal him and above all on Jesus as his Lord and Saviour.  How are we challenged by this passage to see things differently – to see others differently and to see God differently.    

 

ReMoving

Most of us will never have to make a decision like Ruth’s.  She lived in one of the most violent and chaotic periods of Israel’s history, when life was vulnerable and unpredictable.  And for a women particularly so.  In these circumstances, to lose your husband is more than a bereavement -  it was life-threatening.  So,  when in famines that stalked those times, all the men of your family were lost, then life changes forever. All you can do is seek help from what is left of your wider family, wherever they are, scatter to the winds, trust in the future and whatever you believe in. And that is what should have happened – Naomi returning to her homeland and her daughters-in-law to their mother’s house.  BUT, and this is where the story for Israel and for us changes, Ruth refuses to do what is reasonable and will not leave her mother.  It is ordinary human decision taken in extraordinary times.  And the point about the book of Ruth is not romance or happy endings beloved of Hollywood, but that God is involved in the ordinary decision we have to take – and in the outcomes.  And all God needs is a pinch of faithfulness…..

3 things about Ruth that tell us about being faithful disciples:
 

1.  Ruth chooses to engage with the unknown.  The safest choice was to return to her mother’s household, where she was known and could have expected to find a welcome and a new life.  To choose to go to an unknown land, and unknown people was however what in the end defined Ruth. 

2.  Ruth chose to journey to the edge, to a place of vulnerability.  Jesus – beatitudes: blessed are the needy and those who know their need.
” May the Lord reward you for your deeds, and may you have a full reward from the Lord, the God of Israel, under whose wings you have come for refuge” (2:12)

3.  At the edge, she is found. Jesus’ tells many stories of things lost and found… and a son who is lost and found.  Ruth is found by Boaz, who sees her faithfulness & is drawn to her.  This is not a story with a happy ending so much as a story of how God entrusts his story to those who are called to be faithful.

 

ReEngaging

1. HOW does God call us.   Moses must have thought he had just about enough happen to him  - a foundling, a Prince, a runaway & found , a new life in Midian..  but his life was just about to begin!  His opening to God was his curiosity.. a flame of fire out of a bush, but bush was not consumed “I must turn aside and look at this sight”  God calls us whatever we’ve been through & invites us to “turn aside” from our preoccupations to sense his presence.  Stephen Hawking suggest that “we do not need God” to answer to mysteries of the universe, but there is much to wonder at (what is our prupose, our meaning?)

2. WHERE does God meet us  Moses meets at his place of work, on the hillside… Celtic “thin places”  

There is something here about being always open to God… something about a worldly God… Jesus met the disciples at the lake

3.  WHAT does God want of us? To be transformed.. Moses from keeping the flocks (a rather disreputable profession) to leading a nation.  God calls out what is always already within us.. God wants us to be the people he dreams us to be (Jesus & disciples – put out into deep water – be fishermen, but you can be so much more…

 

ReCalling

Wrestling with God…
There are  three aspects to  Jacob’s wrestling with God which can help us understand our sense of calling:

1. He would not let go.  The River is a dangerous place – and night time especially so. There were many stories of being ambushed by enemies human and spiritual.  And Jacob, when put to the test here demonstrates an extraordinary perseverance, if not downright  stubbornness.

Jacob is after all the one who would not let go – of his inheritance, of his place (to the point of fearfulness of any loss – runs away with so many things, possessions, wives, blessings) – but here he will run no longer..  The Psalms are also full of a determination not to let go of God…Calling is about staying with something and allowing God’s call to shape our lives


2. He was called by his name Most of us have not chosen our name, and we may be amused by the meanings of our given names.. but there is another sort of name, the one given by God.

In Matthew’s gospel, Jesus names Peter as “the rock”  - hardly a name he deserved by his actions, but it is a name founded in God’s future, when Peter will be strong and unmoving in the name of Jesus. And all Jesus needs to name him is a glimpse of that future, which he finds in Peters’ response “You are the Messiah…”

And Jacob re-names Israel “For you have striven with God and with humans, and have prevailed” – it is in the struggle that we find God, in our moments of doubt and fear that we encounter our true names.  (one who strives doesn’t sound like an attractive or easy nam, but it is the one God gave him)

So, in the end, God will not let go of him…

 3. He saw the face of God. 

The face is a crucial way of communicating – although we’ve become much more attuned to body language, it’s the face that can give us away & still makes the most impact (only 10% of impact in the words we use!!).  We talk about meeting someone face-to-face (and many of our problems are because we can’t or won’t do that!)

The people of Israel were hugely concerned to protect the holiness of God – God could not be named or seen (always the mystery, the inviting one, the one in cloud or fire or light)

BUT in an extraordinary moment the face of God is seen (still mysterious, unknown in some way but as a mark of favour or commissioning)

At Bethel he saw a vision of the path to heaven, but at Jabbok he encountered God – a God who was interested in him, who knew his true nature & name and who would not le him go until he had shared that with him. 

And us… we see the face of god in others (Matthew 25), and supremely in Jesus..  calling is not just words, it’s about feeling, being drawn to something or someone (just as Fresh Expressions of church are a call to reach out to particular people or communities)


Sermon Notes
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Webpage icon Andrew's Sermon Notes - November 2011
Webpage icon Andrew's Sermon Notes - Sept 2012
Webpage icon Andrew's Sermon Notes for Evangelism
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